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We should all support @TonyRobinsonOBE’s petition for a #LivingWage and fair payment terms.

Two simple ways for national and local government to boost the UK economy.

The UK government should boost the economy with these two simple (and ultimately self-funding) measures: prompt payment of invoices and a Living Wage. This is not just some vague soft-left plea for fairness – it is a view expressed by thoughtful people across the political spectrum, including from many supporters of the free market.

Pay in full – pay on time

All government departments and government supported organisations (Quangos and such), whether local or national, should pay all their suppliers’ invoices within 72 hours.  There are two reasons for this – one moral and the other economic.

The moral case: if suppliers have provided goods and services as agreed, they should not have to wait for payment. Government (unlike private enterprise) does not have to worry about cash flow – it can always fund its payments out of borrowing or revenue. Society (all of us) should not be riding on the backs of the people (many of us) who supply it with goods and services.

The economic case: cash flow is the big killer of businesses – particularly of micro-businesses and Small and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs). By paying its suppliers faster, the government will reduce the likelihood of them (or their suppliers) having cash flow problems. As such, fewer companies would go into administration, and so fewer creditors would be out of pocket and fewer employees would be out of work. More reliable cash flow might also make it easier for more companies to borrow to fund expansion – so boosting growth.

Pay a living wage for a fair days work

All levels of government should ensure that everyone working for the state (whether directly or on contract) is paid a Living Wage (currently put at £7.65 an hour by the Living Wage Foundation) rather than just a subsistence minimum wage (of just £6.31 an hour). Again, there are good moral and economic grounds for this.

The moral justification: we all benefit from the work of these people and they are often among the most vulnerable in society (many are a product of shortcomings in our state education system). We should at least treat them with the decency and respect we’d want for ourselves. We (society) should not be riding on the backs of the weakest, simply because they lack the means to negotiate more equitable rates of pay for themselves.

The economic justification: paying the lowest paid a Living Wage (which, let’s face it, is still pitifully low) would reduce the amount they have to claim in working tax credits and other complex benefits that are costly to administer. People would also be able to plan their lives more effectively, including spending more time with their children, which would mean fewer chaotic and failing families (with all their associated social costs).

According to KPMG, which supports the Living Wage, some 21% of Britain’s 25m workers are paid less than the Living Wage. Of these, some 891,000 are on the minimum wage. Increasing their pay to £7.65 an hour would make them some £2,500 a year better off.

KPMG UK (which has paid the Living Wage, as a minimum, to all directly employed staff and those employed by its sub-contractors and suppliers since 2006) reports that employee turnover among its contracted cleaning staff has “more than halved since paying the Living Wage.” There is also good evidence to show that paying the Living Wage increases productivity by boosting morale and reducing levels of employee sickness caused by the stress of working multiple jobs just to make ends meet.

“Paying the Living Wage is not only morally right,” says Boris Johnson (Mayor of London), “but makes good business sense too.”

Currently, QE is supporting the economy but, in the words of a leading hedge fund manager, it is the “biggest redistribution of wealth from the middle class and the poor to the rich ever.” Paying the poorest workers a Living Wage would help (in a very small way) to redress this. It would also enable them both to save and to spend more, both of which would help boost the economy (since saving is used to fund investment elsewhere) and so increase tax revenues.

Government (local and national) should require these things of its suppliers – as part of their Corporate Social Responsibility (#CSR) commitments – something that many companies seem to go on about, without really understanding what social responsibility means. Apparently the European Commission has clearly stated that applying such socially responsible conditions to public sector contracts, particularly relating to paying the Living Wage, is fine provided they are not discriminatory – so there is nothing stopping this, except a lack of political will.

Support the call – sign this petition today

In November 2013, @TonyRobinsonOBE started a petition urging the UK government to pay its bills on time and pay the Living Wage as a minimum. But he went further, he urged the government to use its powers of negotiation (rather than legislation) to persuade all government suppliers to commit to paying all invoices within 30 days and all employees the Living Wage as a minimum, if they want to win government contracts in future. In other words, make those bidding for such lucrative contracts “an offer they cannot refuse.”

This approach appeals because it uses government buying power as a force for good – setting the agenda/leading by example, whatever you like to call it – without going down the complex (and anti-free market) route of legislation. Also, it doesn’t force cost increases on the very smallest companies, which sometimes struggle to employ people on the minimum wage as they start to expand. And it doesn’t deter companies from doing business in the UK (since they don’t have to apply for government contracts if they don’t want to or can’t make them pay on these terms).

Socially Responsible Investment (#SRI)

I am also pleased to see that Socially Responsible Investors, such as CCLA, are now considering a Living Wage as an important factor for their ethical investments.  The more private investors can put pressure on their SRI fund managers to do this the better. In time, we might hope to see paying a Living Wage as an integral part of all Corporate Social Responsibility (#CSR) policies. So please sign Tony’s petition today and help improve the lives of millions of people.

Huw Sayer

@Business_Write

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